ARBORICULTURE, AGRICULTURE & HORTICULTURE

ID: 24364
£950.00
England's improvement reviv'd:

SMITH, John, England's improvement reviv'd: in a treatise of all manner of husbandry & trade by land and sea. Plainly discovering the several ways of improveing all sorts of waste and barren grounds, and enriching all earths; with the natural quality of all lands, and the several seeds and plants which most naturally thrive therein. Together with the manner of planting all sorts of timber-trees, and under-woods, with two several chains to plant seeds or sets by; with several directions to make walks, groves, orchards, gardens, planting of hops and good fences; with the vertue of trees, plants, and herbs, and their physical use; with an alphabet of all herbs growing in the kitchin, and physick-gardens; and physical directions. Also the way of ordering cattel, with several observations about sheep, and choice of cows for the dairy, all sorts of dear, tame conies, variety of fowles, bees, silk-worms, pigeons, fish-ponds, decoys: with directions to make an aviary. And with accounts of digging, delving, and all charges and profits arising in all fore-mentioned: and a particular view of every part of the pleasant land: with many other remarks never before extant. Experienced in thirty years practise, and digested into six books, by John Smith, Gent. Published for the common good. London, printed by Tho. Newcomb, for Benjamin Southwood, at the Star next to Sergeants-Inn in Chancery lane; and Israel Harrison near Lincolns-Inn. 1673.

4to., (14) + 270pp., wanting the initial blank, Bookseller to the Reader leaf & title-page laid down, title-page with critique of book around margins in ink ("a most excellent work considering when it was written"), cut close at head very occasionally touching the running title, some paper browning, well bound in the late 19th/early 20th century in dark blue crushed morocco, spine gilt and lettered with raised bands, all edges gilt. A very good copy.

Second edition (first published in 1670).

Amongst other things, Smith drew attention to "the great wastes and decay of all woods and timber in England", and the need for replanting. "Besides dealing with forestry, the book is concerned with livestock and the reclamation of waste land. The sixth 'book' contains an interesting description of the islands of Orkney and Shetland and the fishing industry in those parts" (Henrey). The work is prefaced by a report by John Evelyn, written at the request of the Royal Society.